Jayson Shanafelt

Company Member

Jayson was supposed to make his stage premier as a chorus member in his elementary school’s recounting of Lewis and Clark. Petrified, the 10-year old told his mother he wasn’t feeling well to get out of it. He told his mom he wouldn’t be missed as he only had a line and a half, which was shared among seven kids. Born into an empathetic family, his mother lovingly allowed him to stay home. And his love for theatre had not yet begun.

In 8th grade, he took a drama class. The teacher pulled him aside and told him that he showed real promise. She had written a play and she wanted Jayson to star. “Sure,” he exclaimed, “What is it?” “It’s called ‘Rap: The True Story of Rapunzel.’” It was about a guy with long blond hair and a surfer’s cadence, emotionally stuck in the 60s and physically stuck in a tower, who is rescued by a modern woman in a pant-suit. It was very progressive. Rehearsals were a joy, until his teacher let it slip that the play would be performed for the entire middle school. He wondered what had happened to the original plan—performing for the welcoming and forgiving gaze of just parents. This time, he knew there was no way out. The stakes were too high! With an extremely upset stomach, he went out on the stage, said his first line, and he was, like, totally hooked dude.

In high-school, he was in a handful of school productions, performed in children’s theatre, sang in the chamber choir, jazz choir, and even made the cut for the boy’s sextet—an extremely covetous position for fellow choir geeks. In his off hours, he moonlighted as a mascot for a local furniture company something for something. (Due to confidentiality reasons, this section has been omitted.)

Jayson met David Smith-English in 1998, thus sparking a beautiful partnership. Since then, he has not only had the opportunity to play with theatre companies in Portland, but he is also a founding company member of Clackamas Rep.

Over the years, Jayson has played the straight man, the romantic lead, the comic relief, the villain, the lady, the idiot, and even Russian #2.

Jayson was supposed to make his stage premier as a chorus member in his elementary school’s recounting of Lewis and Clark. Petrified, the 10-year old told his mother he wasn’t feeling well to get out of it. He told his mom he wouldn’t be missed as he only had a line and a half, which was shared among seven kids. Born into an empathetic family, his mother lovingly allowed him to stay home. And his love for theatre had not yet begun.

In 8th grade, he took a drama class. The teacher pulled him aside and told him that he showed real promise. She had written a play and she wanted Jayson to star. “Sure,” he exclaimed, “What is it?” “It’s called ‘Rap: The True Story of Rapunzel.’” It was about a guy with long blond hair and a surfer’s cadence, emotionally stuck in the 60s and physically stuck in a tower, who is rescued by a modern woman in a pant-suit. It was very progressive. Rehearsals were a joy, until his teacher let it slip that the play would be performed for the entire middle school. He wondered what had happened to the original plan—performing for the welcoming and forgiving gaze of just parents. This time, he knew there was no way out. The stakes were too high! With an extremely upset stomach, he went out on the stage, said his first line, and he was, like, totally hooked dude.

In high-school, he was in a handful of school productions, performed in children’s theatre, sang in the chamber choir, jazz choir, and even made the cut for the boy’s sextet—an extremely covetous position for fellow choir geeks. In his off hours, he moonlighted as a mascot for a local furniture company something for something. (Due to confidentiality reasons, this section has been omitted.)

Jayson met David Smith-English in 1998, thus sparking a beautiful partnership. Since then, he has not only had the opportunity to play with theatre companies in Portland, but he is also a founding company member of Clackamas Rep.

Over the years, Jayson has played the straight man, the romantic lead, the comic relief, the villain, the lady, the idiot, and even Russian #2.